Sunday, March 26, 2017

BEYLERBEYİ PALACE

Beylerbeyi, Üsküdar - Istanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'35.0"N 29°02'24.0"E / 41.043056, 29.040000

Beylerbeyi Palace / Uskudar - Istanbul photo beylerbeyi_palace135.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

The Beylerbeyi Palace is located along the Anatolian coast of the Bosphorus at Beylerbeyi, north of Üsküdar. Beylerbeyi Palace was thought to serve as a summer residence of Ottoman sultans and a state guest house to entertain the foreign heads of state and sovereigns and it was constructed on demand of the sultan of the period, Sultan Abdülaziz (1861 - 1876). Construction of the palace was commenced on 6 August 1863 and it was formally opened to usage on 21 April 1865, Friday.

Serkiz Bey (Balyan), the Ebniye-i Şahane Serkalfa (head master builder of the Palace), carried out the construction organization. Mehmed Efendi, Mahmud Efendi and Rıfat Efendi performed the duty of construction official, which can also be thought as supervision of the financial and administrative affairs, of Beylerbeyi Palace. It is estimated that the palace costed about 500 thousands Ottoman liras. Beylerbeyi Palace, which is the main building of the building complex is a two-storey construction, made of stone, on a high basement.

HISTORY

On this imperial coastal estate that rests on the woody Çamlıca hills, a Byzantine settlement is known to have existed as early as the sixth century when Emperor Constantine II (578-582) erected a church with a golden cross (stavros) that gave the area its name. The terraced gardens at Istavroz, known as Istavroz Bahçesi, were a popular resort area for the royal family. The Sevkabad Pavilion, built by Ahmed III (1603-1617) atop the hill, was used frequently by his successors Murad IV (1623-1640) and Mehmed IV (1648-1687) who came to hunt here.

Restored and enlarged by Ahmed III (1703-1730) and Mahmud I (1730-1754), the garden complex consisted of tiled and domed pavilions around a pool, baths, prayer rooms and service structures. Ottoman dignitaries also built mansions here. The name Beylerbeyi, which was not adopted until later, is thought to refer to Mehmed Paşa, the governor-general (Beylerbeyi) of the Rumelian provinces, who built his coastal complex here during the rule of Murad III (1574-1595).

Sultan Mustafa III (1757-1774) demolished the estate and sold off its lands. These lands were subsequently acquired by Sultan Mahmud I (1808-1839) to erect a summer palace at the Istavroz Gardens. The Yellow Palace, designed by royal architect Krikor Amira Balyan, was completed between 1829 and 1832 and consisted of a main building with administrative and harem sections, kiosks, servants quarters, baths, kitchens, cisterns and stables.

This wooden palace, praised in the well-known travelers' accounts by Fieldmarshal Helmuth von Moltke and Miss Julie Pardoe, succumbed to fire in 1851 and its site was abandoned until 1864 when Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876) ordered the construction of a fireproof masonry palace.

Beylerbeyi Palace was used as a summer palace by Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876). During the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz ve Abdülhamid II, the palace acquired the characteristics of a state guest house beginning with its allocation to the foreign states’ sovereigns and presidents during their official visits. The first important guest, who was entertained at Beylerbeyi Palace, was Empress Eugenie of France. This visit of the Empress was a return visit of Sultan Abdülaziz’s visit to France in 1867.

The palace was generally reserved for summer use by the sultans or to accommodate foreign heads of state visiting the Ottoman capital. The Prince of Serbia, the King of Montenegro, the Şah of Iran and Empress Eugenie of France are among the royal guests who stayed here. Other foreign guests who were entertained at Beylerbeyi Palace during the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz were Joseph, the Emperor of Austria-Hungary (1869), Frédéric Guillaume Nicola Charles, the Crown Prince of Prussia (1869), The Crown Prince of Italia (1869) and Nasıreddin, the Şah of Iran (18 August 1873). During 33 years of reign of Sultan Abdülhamid II (1876-1909), Beylerbeyi Palace served as a museum which was especially visited by foreign state protocol.

The area of Beylerbeyi on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus has been settled since Byzantine times. According to the famous 18th century traveler İnciciyan, Constantine the Great erected a cross here, after which the area was known as the Istavroz Gardens. Under the Ottomans this area was an imperial park or "hasbahçe". İnciciyan relates that the name Beylerbeyi was given to this area in the 16th century because Mehmed Paşa who held the title of beylerbeyi (governor general) built a country house on the site.

During that period, also Dolmabahçe Palace and Imperial Treasury of Topkapı Palace were used as Imperial museums which would have been visited with prior permission of the Sultan. Sultan Abdülhamit II, soon after his dethronement, was subjected to compulsory residence at Salonica Alatini Kiosk. However about 3 years later, due to eruption of Balkan War, he was taken to Istanbul. New compulsory residence, chosen for Sultan Abdülhamid II, was Beylerbeyi Palace. Former Sultan spent his last six years there and departed from life on 10 February 1918 at this palace.

Foreign state guests were entertained at Beylerbeyi Palace during the Period of Republic. Pehlevi, the Şah of Iran who visited Turkey in 1934, was entertained at this palace by Gazi Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. Balkan Games Festival was organized at Beylerbeyi Palace in 1936. Mustafa Kemal Atatürk spent that night at the historical bedroom of Beylerbeyi Palace.

ARCHITECTURE

The new summer palace, called Beylerbeyi, is designed by head architect Sarkis Balyan (1835-1899) and his brother Agop Balyan (1838-1875) in French neo-baroque style with a traditional Ottoman plan. It has a rectangular plan with the long side facing the water and consists of six halls and twenty-four rooms on two floors raised on a service basement. The six halls, three on each floor, are lined up along the longitudinal axis from southwest to northeast.

The building was constructed on a land of about 2,500 square meters sits on a rectangular floor area. The South side of the Palace was organized as Imperial Mabeyn and The North side as Valide Sultan’s Apartment. There are total 6 halls, 24 rooms, 1 hamam and 1 bathroom at two storeys. Beylerbeyi Palace, which was constructed as a mixture of Western and Eastern styles, has the layout characteristics of traditional Turkish House with Harem and Mabeyn Sections. The roof of the construction was surrounded with a blaustrade hiding all edges.

The palace has a plan composition based on a central sofa (hall) design with iwans. The schema of Beylerbeyi Palace consists of three parts: Imperial Mabeyn, Bedroom Apartment (Sultan’s Apartment) and Valide Sultan’s Apartment. The main Harem section, next to the Valide Sultan’s (sultan’s mother) Apartment and constructed in parallel with the sea, which belongs to kadinefendi (sultan’s wives) and the favourites, was constructed apart from the main building and it was not be able to survive until today.

Round cascading steps in front of the mabeyn lead into the entrance hall (giriş holü), which has a double set of stairs at its rear end that give access to the reception hall above. Both halls are lit with iwans facing the mabeyn gardens to the southwest. The reception hall, also known as the Hall with Mother-of-Pearl, is adjoined by an audience room with luxurious wood paneling known as the Wooden Room (Ahşap Oda) on the seaside and a dining room on the landward side.

A corridor to the left of the mabeyn entrance hall leads into the Hall with Pool (Havuzlu Salon), named after a large oval pool at its center. The Hall with Pool, together with the Blue Hall (Mavi Salon) above it, occupies the center of the building, linking mabeyn with harem. Facing both the sea in front and the land wall behind, the two halls are linked by a double staircase with a skylight on the harem side. The Blue Hall, which is also known as the Ceremonial Hall, is named after its sixteen blue columns with orientalist capitals separating the central space from its iwans and aisles. Its roof is raised on sixteen arched windows that illuminate the hall from above.

The Hall with Pool and some of its corner rooms, as well as some rooms adjoining the Blue Hall have naval scenes painted on their ceilings featuring Ottoman ships; the Admiral Room (Kaptan Paşa Odası) on the ground floor also has furnishings based on the naval theme. Much of the furniture used in the palace was brought from Europe, including crystal chandeliers from Bohemia and vases from Sevres; a wide collection of Chinese and Japanese vases is also displayed in the palace.

The facade of Imperial Mabeyn exhibits a design in which Neo-baroque style is more evident. Indoor arrangements of the Palace, like its mass and faces, are shaped with an eclectic understanding. Owing to the sea passion of Sultan Abdulaziz, who constructed Beylerbeyi Palace, sea and ship themes were drawn in some frames and cartridges on the ceiling of the Palace; moreover, Sultan Abdulaziz drew some patterns including sea and ship themes in order to give an idea to the painters.

Many of the palace service structures, such as the kitchens, have not survived. Sections of the larger gardens, including the deer woods, were given to nearby schools while some small structures once found in the gardens have not survived: the Sultan's or Hünkar Kiosk (Hünkar Köşkü), the music pavilion (Muzika Dairesi), the deer house (Geyiklik), the lion house (Aslanhane), the dove cote (Güvercinlik) and the bird pavilion (Büyük Kuşluk). The palace baths up the hill have been demolished to make way for road expansion.

Today, the remaining palace buildings stand in the shadow of the cross-continental Bosphorus Bridge built in 1974; the supports for the colossal suspension bridge are situated immediately below the stables. The palace complex is flanked by the dormitories of the guards (Hamlacılar Kışlası) and the military barracks and soup kitchens built by Sultan Abdülhamid I (1774-1789) down the Bosphorus, and an old residential neighborhood is found to its north.

INTERIOR DESIGN

The interior decoration, guided by painter Migirdic Civanyan, reflects nineteenth century Ottoman eclecticism, which is a creative amalgam of Western neo-classical styles and traditional Ottoman elements such as the muqarnas, Bursa arch, interlaced arabesques and calligraphic forms. The floors, where not paved with parquet, are covered with straw mats from Egypt over which Hereke carpets are laid. The palace was illuminated by gasworks while no provisions were made for heating during the colder months.

The interior design of Beylerbeyi Palace is a synthesis of diverse western and eastern styles, although the layout of the rooms follows that of the traditional Turkish house, consisting of a central sofa with closed rooms situated at the four corners. The furnishing and decoration of the Selamlık or public apartments are more ornate than those of the Harem. Corridors from the two central halls lead into the living quarters or the harem, which is smaller than the mabeyn and simpler in decoration. It consists of rooms clustered around two small halls, the entrance hall and a central hall above, that are linked with a double-staircase.

Some of the rooms appear today as Sultan Abdülhamid II (1876-1908) used them while under house arrest from 1912 until his death in 1918, with furniture bearing his monogram or initials. Empress Eugenie of France (1853-1870), during her visit to Istanbul in 1869, stayed at the Beylerbeyi harem; Emperor Joseph of Austro-Hungary, Shah Nasireddin of Iran, Prince Nicholas of Montenegro and Crown Prince Oscar of Sweden were also hosted at this palace.

The palace consists of two main storeys and a basement containing kitchens and store rooms. The palace has three entrances, six state rooms and 26 smaller rooms. The floors are covered with rush matting from Egypt which protected the inhabitants against damp in winter and heat in summer. Over this are laid large carpets and kilims, mostly made at Hereke. The furnishings include exquisite Bohemian crystal chandeliers, French clocks, and Chinese, Japanese, French and Turkish Yıldız porcelain vases.

State functions are held in the state apartments (or mabeyn) entered from the southwest, whereas the two halls to the northeast with their surrounding rooms constitute the living quarters or harem, entered from the opposite end of the palace. Both sections are preceded by shady gardens with pine, red-leaf beech, and magnolia trees planted around large oval pools. Although a uniform and symmetrical look has been maintained for the waterfront, a tall wall is used to separate the two gardens behind the palace.

KIOSKS

A wall close to human height separates the palace and its gardens from the quay. Two sea gates rise above the walls near the mabeyn and harem entrances. Further out, located midway into the garden on each side is a small sea kiosk (Yalı Köşkü) with a tent-like roof. The kiosks are entered from the gardens through a portico and make octagonal projections onto the quay. Behind, the palace and its gardens are protected by a tall land wall, which becomes a retaining wall for terraced gardens behind the mabeyn.

Sea Kiosks
Two Sea Kiosks were built as double, one belonging to Mabeyn and the other to Valide Sultan (Harem); the kiosks have the appearance of a garden pergola. The kiosks, which are one of the most interesting design examples of the new palace were identified in the archives by the names, pointing out the originality of the design, as Çadır Köşkleri (Tent Kiosks), Nevresm (new design, new model). Octagonal covers of the kiosks are decorated with different animal figures.

Marble (Serdab) Kiosk
The Serdab or sunken kiosk (Serdab Köşkü), also known as marble kiosk (Mermer Köşk), is a three-room marble structure partially buried into the retaining wall of the terrace above. With views out to the pool in front and the Bosphorus beyond, the kiosk is designed to provide solace from the summer heat; a central fountain, linked with channels to two wall fountains at either end of the main room, humidifies and cools the marble interior.

Marble Kiosk is one of the buildings from the period of Sultan Mahmud II, which survived until today. It was given this name due to its marble covered surfaces. As we learn from the references of the period another names of the kiosk are Serdab and Mahmud Kiosk. It was given the name Serdáb since it is buried into the fourth terrace behind the pool.

Yellow Kiosk
Yellow Kiosk, which is located on the fourth terrace garden of Beylerbeyi Palace, considering with the area it is located on, may be thought to be used for resting purposes. It is on the northeast of the land of the palace, on the fourth terrace. Located at the same level to the east of the pool is the Sari or yellow kiosk, a two-story structure with a basement, oriented to views of the lower Bosphorus and the Çamlıca hills above.

Ahır (Stable) Kiosk
It is located on the last terrace of the Palace’s garden, slightly farther from the Marble Kiosk. It has some characteristics reflecting the attitude of Ottoman towards horse culture. In its entrance, there are figures of horses and other animals on the ceiling. Stable section consists of total 20 divisions on both sides. There are reliefs with horse head and eye figures on the chandeliers and other elements.

The stables (Ahır Köşkü), the only remaining equestrian structure in an Ottoman palace, is a long rectangular building with an octagonal entrance hall projecting outward at the center. Entered through a broad pair of glass doors, the entrance hall leads into the brick-paved main space with a small marble pool and twenty stalls. Paintings of horses decorate the ceilings of the kiosk entrance hall whose arched windows resemble horseshoes.

GARDENS

Terrace Gardens
Beylerbeyi Palace is also an important artifact in terms of its location within the landscape and is one of the most distinguished examples of coast palaces. Beylerbeyi Palace, which is located at the Anatolian side of Bosphorus at Üsküdar district is in a large garden. The garden of Beylerbeyi Palace has the appearance of a rich coppice forest with terrace gardens at the back.

The garden terraces were originally built by Mahmud II in 1830. The five main terraces of varied width are divided into seven different levels in places and rise up to 35 meters above sea level. The forth terrace has a large pool overlooked by the Serdab and Sarı Kiosks, the pool and the Serdab Kiosk were built by Sultan Mahmud II. Stairs and ramps, as seen today, were added by Sultan Abdülaziz who also reorganized the gardens in naturalist style.

Of the two gates that serve the palace on the landward side, one opens into a tunnel built earlier by Mahmud I that, passing underneath the garden terrace, exits out to the southwest end of the mabeyn gardens. Here, a ramp climbs alongside a tall wall separating the palace from the service and military structures and gives access to the first, second and third terraces to the left and the stables midway to the right.

One of the features which distinguishes Beylerbeyi from other Ottoman palaces of the period are the terraced gardens on the sloping hillside behind the palace. There are two pavilions on these terraces, the Sarı Köşk beside the pool on the upper terrace, and the Mermer Köşk with its interior fountain and marble walls, which provided a cool refuge in the summer heat. The Mermer Köşk, the large pool on the lower terrace and the tunnel are the only parts of the palace remaining from the earlier timber palace of Beylerbeyi. The attractive Ahır Köşk is a fascinating example of Ottoman palace stables, and of particular interest as the only such building to have survived in its original state.

The old coastal road passed under a long tunnel constructed during the reign of Sultan Mahmud II (1808-1839) so that the palace would not be separated from the terraced gardens behind. This is a unique feature, other palaces and mansions along the Bosphorus being connected to their back gardens and parks by bridges. Today this tunnel houses a cafeteria and sales points for visitors. As well as books, postcards and posters published by the Culture and Information Centre, various gifts and souvenirs are on sale here. The gardens are available for private receptions upon advance application.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Beylerbeyi Palace

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

HİDİV PAVILLION

Çubuklu, Beykoz - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°06'17.2"N 29°04'28.1"E / 41.104778, 29.074472

Hidiv Pavilion / Cubuklu, Beykoz - Istanbul photo hidiv_pavilion136.jpg

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The palace stands on a hilltop within a large grove of some 270 acres (110 ha) above the Çubuklu neighborhood in the Beykoz district, overlooking the Istanbul Strait. The Khedive Palace (Turkish: Hidiv Kasrı) or Çubuklu Palace, Çubuklu Summer Palace, (Çubuklu Sarayı); Hidiv Mansion; located on the Asian side of the Bosporus in Istanbul, Turkey, was a former residence of Khedive Abbas II of Egypt and Sudan. The name of the residence is alternatively rendered in English as the Khedive Pavilion or the Khedive Mansion.

Hidiv Pavilion is located on the hills of Cubuklu neighborhood in Beykoz district on the Asian side of Istanbul. Hidiv Kasrı (Hidiv Pavilion), the residence of Abbas Hilmi Pasha, the Khedive of Egypt, was built by the Italian architect Delfo Seminati in 1907. It has been built with the understanding of European style on a quarter of 1000 square meters and is located in a large grove (Hidiv Grove) above Çubuklu at the Anatolian side of the Bosphorus.

When Egypt gained its independence from the Ottoman Empire, Abbas Hilmi Paşa, (the khedive of Egypt), the last Ottoman governor of Egypt, was dismissed from his position as khedive after an interview with Sultan Mehmet Reşat V, the 35th Ottoman Sultan and the son of Sultan Abdülmecid. Abbas Hilmi Paşa then settled in the Hidiv Kasrı with his family in Istanbul.

Abbas II (reigned 1892-1914) was the last Khedive of Egypt and Sudan. Unlike his predecessors, Abbas II sought co-operative relations with the Ottoman Empire, whose sovereignty over Egypt had effectively been rendered purely theoretical ever since Muhammad Ali's seizure of power in 1805. Abbas saw this as a potential means of undermining the British occupation of Egypt and Sudan.

As part of his efforts at improving relations with the Ottoman Porte, Abbas made several visits to the Ottoman capital Istanbul, and commissioned Italian architect Antonio Lasciac (1856-1946) assisted by Delfo Seminati, to build a summer residence at the Bosporus. The palace, completed in 1907, was designed in the Art Nouveau style, mainly inspired by Italian villas of the Renaissance era, incorporating characteristics and details of neo-classical Ottoman architecture.

The Hidiv (Khedive) Kasrı was built by Delfo Seminati, an Italian Architect, on the ridge of coppice forest of Çubuklu, Istanbul in 1907. It covers a total area of 1000 square meters and is in an “art-nouveau” style. In the center of the main entrance of the Hidiv Kasrı, there is a marble fountain. Connections among pavilion’s hall draws a circle around the pool and the circle is only being cut (stop) in the entrance hall. The ceiling of Kasır is covered by stained glass.

Surrounded by marble terraces, the three-storey building's east front is square, and the south and northwest sides are crescent-shaped. A unique feature of the structure is a high tower. A monumental fountain at the main entrance rises all the way to the roof. In the surroundings of the residence, there are other fine fountains and pools. The rose garden of the residence is the largest in Istanbul.

The two large bedrooms have panelled walls, inner toilets, and bathrooms placed on the entrance floor. The circle-line shaped section of the hall and fireplace on this floor draw the attention of visitors. In additon, visitors can view a portion of the Bosphorus from the pavilions watchtower. The tower is the most popular section of the kiosk because of its view over the Bosphorus. One can access the terrace either by an elavator or by stairs.

At the ground floor of the 1,000 m2 (11,000 sq ft) palace, several rooms and halls encircle a central hall, which helps connect them with each other. A large hall at the ground level has a fireplace. At the upper floor, two big bedrooms exist. The terrace on top of the building is accessible also by a historic steam-operated elevator. The building is covered from floor to ceiling in stained glass.

The interior is decorated with neo-classical, neo-Islamic and neo-Ottoman features. The capitals of the marble pillars, walls and ceilings are embroidered with figures of flowers, fruit and hunting animals reflecting the effects of European architecture. The outer gate of the building is completely depicted with gilded flower figures.

Abbas' unofficial and secret second wife, Cavidan Hanım (Lady Djavidan or originally Hungarian May Countess Torok von Szendro), claims in her memoirs "Harem" that she decided in all phases of the palace's creation from scratch to the selection of the elements for the interior design. She also assigned the layout of the palace gardens, including the re-planted trees, rose garden and the winding footpaths in the woods.

The plan of the building is designed to draw a circle around the pool by the connections between the halls, except the entrance hall. The rooms are at the upper floors. Especially the two main bedrooms over the saloon with fireplace are extremely attractive with its unique woodwork and inner bathrooms.

Another characteristic of the building is its tower in which half of the Bosphorus can be seen. This tower has a middle floor with balcony and an open terrace, both can be reached either by lift or climbing the stairs if you trust your breath.

After the Khedive of Egypt left Istanbul in the 1930s, Hidiv Kasrı was purchased by the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. However, it was rarely used between the years of 1937 and 1982 but was used as a movie set at times. However, movie makers were very inconsiderate to the pavilion, as they broke the stained glass windows in an attempt make more light for their movies.

After two years of restoration works, the Hidiv Kasrı was reopened in 1984 as a hotel, restaurant, and cafeteria. The inner halls were used as a restaurant, the upper levels as a hotel, and the marble hall and gardens surrounding the residence as cafes. The hotel facility is now closed. The residence can host meetings of up to 1000 people in summer, with cocktail facilities of up to 1500. In winter months, it can accommodate up to 450 people and cocktails for 700.

The gigantic trees in the grove have identity plates. Their shadows cool even the warmest days of Istanbul. The biggest rose garden of Istanbul will be pleased to host you for an enjoyable breakfast at weekends or at 5 o'clock tea.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Beltur / Hidiv Pavilion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : info@beltur.com.tr
Phone : +90 216 413 9253 / +90 216 444 6644
Fax : +90 216 413 9474

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

YENİCAMİ SULTAN'S GALERY

Eminönü, Fatih - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°01'00.2"N 28°58'22.0"E / 41.016725, 28.972772

Yenicami Sultan's Galery / Eminonu, Fatih - Istanbul photo yenicami_hunkarkasri111.jpg

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The northeast corner of the gallery has a gilded screen, behind which members of the imperial court could attend services. This Royal Lodge is connected by a long elevated passageway to a Royal Pavilion in the northeast corner of the mosque complex. The pavilion, where Sultans rested before and after the pray and made ritual ablutions.

The kasır, or mansion, was attached to the mosque on the southeast side with an arch. Although it is known as the Hünkar Kasrı (The Sultan’s Mansion), it was built as a place so the valide sultans who came to the mosque to pray were able to rest. Valide Turhan Sultans not only used it to rest, but during the month of Ramadan, she took up residence there.

The kasr is a suite of rooms accessed via a long sloping corridor where the sultan and his family could rest when visiting the mosque. The two large rooms and connecting corridors are almost entirely covered with İznik tiles (sadly, some had been stolen over the years before its restoration), while glorious stained glass fills the windows. The sloping corridor leading to the kasrı is currently hosting an exhibition of modern calligraphic art.

A small terrace overlooks the confluence of the Golden Horn and the Bosporus while a private entrance leads into the sultan's kiosk inside the mosque, enabling him to come and go in privacy.

The top floor of the kasır has two rooms covered with domes and tiles from floor to ceiling. Three of the five inscriptions in the tiles are from the Quran and two are part of a commemorative poem by Asimi. The lower floor had rooms for servants. There are fireplaces covered with tiles, ceilings made of carved wood and doors and windows decorated with mother-of-pearl. As for the main room (iwan), it leads directly to the sultan’s lodge inside the mosque.

The Royal Pavilion in the mosque is the sole remaining example of classical Turkish architecture. Built on the remains of the Byzantine walls, there’s a small tunnel that leads from Eminönü Square to Bahçekapı.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

BEYKOZ PAVILION

Beykoz Grove, Beykoz - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°08'17.4"N 29°04'53.7"E / 41.138167, 29.081583

Beykoz Pavilion / Istanbul photo beykoz_pavilion110.jpg

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The construction of Beykoz Pavilion started by the order of Mehmed Ali Pasha, Governor of Egypt in 1845 and upon his death completed in 1854 by the order of his son as a present to Sultan Abdülmecid who used to go Beykoz Çayırı and Tokat Promenade on the hills of Hünkar İskelesi. As it was dedicated to Sultan Abdülmecid, it’s also called Mecidiye Pavilion.

Close to Hünkar Quay, Beykoz Pavilion was built by Mehmet Ali Pasha, Khedive of Egypt, for Sultan Abdülmecit and designed by Nigogos and Sarkis Balyan. The construction work, which was initiated in 1855, were later completed by Said Pasha, son of Mehmet Ali Pasha, in 1866. The first brick structure on the Bosphorus, the pavilion was given as a gift to Sultan Abdülaziz when it was completed.

It’s situated on the top of a grove park with a landscape design of layered terraces beginning from the seaside. In its early days Sultan was used here as a short time residence while riding in the area, but later foreign statesmen and ambassadors were received there. Although it was meant to be an imperial building because of its uptown location and pleasant weather it was assigned for public service even in Ottoman period and became an orphanage.

During the following years, the pavilion functioned initially as an orphanage and later as a Trachoma hospital. The building, later became a Tuberculosis Research Hospital in 1963. It is now Children Thoracic Diseases Hospital. In 1920s it became a preventorium and then a Chest Diseases Hospital for children until 1999 when it was taken over by Head Department of National Palaces and restoration works began to open it to public as a museum.

The two-storeyed, half-timbered building has a symmetrical plan and neo-classical façade and designed as a hall in the middle with rooms surrounded. Photographs of the pavilion taken during the reign of Sultan Abdülhamid II reveal its rich decoration with gilded furnitures, upholsteries and curtains of Hereke fabrics, Baccarat vases and big crystal chandeliers.

The stones used on the facade of this pavilion were brought from Italy. This two storey square planned structure’s rooms are located adjacent to the halls on floors. In the pavilion, in whose interior space marble was used, there is no kitchen and bath since it was not used for accommodation.

There’s a resting pavilion in the garden, known as “Mountain Hamam (ancient Turkish bath)”; its inner walls are covered with oyster shells. An artificial cave, within the two hundred acre garden, two domed rooms and the walls were decorated with oyster shells.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Beykoz Pavilion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

FLORYA ATATÜRK MARINE MANSION

Florya, Bakırköy - Istanbul - Turkey

GPS : 0°58'23.0"N 28°46'58.0"E / 40.973056, 28.782778

Florya Ataturk Marine Mansion / Bakirkoy - Istanbul photo florya_mansion107.jpg

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A settlement on the coast of the Marmara Sea between Yeşilköy and Küçükçekmece, Florya is known to be a resort for hunters in the 19. Century. Florya, which gained importance with Atatürk’s interest, has transformed gradually to a summer resting centre.

According to historical documents, Florya coast was full of nice villages in 17th century within its border to Yeşilköy, known as Ayastefanos at the time. Kalatarya district with its oftenly visited church and holy spring and also Imperial Filurya Garden was close to the area. It’s understood from the phrase seen in 18th century documents as "Filoriye garden with its fresh water and Sultan’s palace inside..." there was an Otoman settlement in the area.

Florya and its environs were mostly fishing areas in 19th century and previously. In the late Ottoman Empire urban development began there along with the construction of railway lines and it gained extra importance with the interest of Atatürk in the early Republican period. An area of 230 hectares were afforested and Florya became a summer resort in time. İstanbul Municipality organized a competition for a mansion project in 1935 which planned to have been built in Florya coast where Atatürk used to go for resting. It’s thought to be helpful for his recovery to stay there.

The awarded project designed by architect Seyfi Arkan was in Bauhaus style that was common in European architecture of the period. The building complex designed as a relaxing place consists of Atatürk Mansion, General Secretariat Building and Aides’ Building. There was also the White, Blue and Red pavilions then, but they don’t exist now. The construction was finished in August 14, 1935. The mansion was constructed over the columns stuck to the sea base and was connected to the land with a bridge.

In the mansion opened to visitors on August 14, 1935, Atatürk lived for a long period over the June and July in 1936, used the mansion for political and scientific meetings and hosted certain guests like Edward VIII, the king of Great Britain and Madame Simpson. Atatürk didn’t use the mansion just for resting but occasionally managed the affairs of state while he was in İstanbul, held political and scientific conferences and hosted many important guests there among whom were King Edward III of England and Mrs. Simpson. He stayed there for the last time in May 28, 1938.

During the period he stayed at Dolmabahçe Palace, Atatürk came to the mansion by boat and enjoyed swimming surrounded by local people. He used the mansion for the last three years of his life as a summer office as well as for recreation. In 1936, he stayed from June 6 until July 28 at the mansion. His last stay was on May 28, 1938, about six months before his death.

After his death it was used as a Presidential summer residence by İsmet İnönü, Celal Bayar, Cemal Gürsel, Cevdet Sunay, Fahri Korutürk and Kenan Evren.

This group of structures was transferred to the Department of National Palaces under the Turkish Grand National Assembly (TGNA) by the Presidency of the Republic on September 16, 1988. After the completion of its restoration, decorated with the furniture of that period suiting the style of the mansion which was designed with a modern understanding in its period the mansion was made an Atatürk Museum and a permanent photograph exhibition named "Atatürk is in Istanbul" was formed in it.

Some of the buildings of Yaverlik and General Secretariat constructed behind the Atatürk mansion could not survive till today and the rest were restored to become TGNA social facilities. In the empty place between these buildings a structure serving as a cafe and a restaurant was annexed.

The Presidency assigned its management to TBMM, Head Department of National Palaces in September 16, 1988 and it was opened to public as "Atatürk Museum" at 1993 after being restored. It was erected on steel piles driven into the sea bottom and linked to the mainland by a bridge of 90 meters in length. The one-storeyed building has a modest facade design and seems like a floating boat.

ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESING

The tower situated on the north entrance facade is in the geometrical and aesthetic form of modern architecture. The perpendicular part to the shore consists of service and staff rooms, bathrooms and toilets. Atatürk’s study room, bathroom and bedroom are on its east side. The walnut and bird’s eye veneered bookcase, tape player in Artdeco style, furnitures like the armchair with spring balance function and lighting fittings are compatible with mansion’s modest, modern and original architectural design.

Designed in the Bauhaus style by architect Seyfi Arkan, who was given the commission in 1935 by the municipality of Istanbul, the mansion was completed on August 14 the same year, and was gifted to Atatürk.

The building is constructed on steel piles driven into the seabed and is connected to the sandy beach about 70 m (230 ft) away with a wooden pier. The L-shaped, one-floor mansion consists of a reception hall, a reading room, bedrooms and bathroom. There are also service and staff rooms at the complex. The total area covered by the mansion including the pier is 602 m2 (6,480 sq ft).

It was erected on steel piles driven into the sea bottom and linked to the mainland by a bridge of 90 meters in length. The one-storeyed building has a modest facade design and seems like a floating boat. The tower situated on the north entrance facade is in the geometrical and aesthetic form of modern architecture.

The perpendicular part to the shore consists of service and staff rooms, bathrooms and toilets. Atatürk’s study room, bathroom and bedroom are on its east side. The walnut and bird’s eye veneered bookcase, tape player in Artdeco style, furnitures like the armchair with spring balance function and lighting fittings are compatible with mansion’s modest, modern and original architectural design.

A grove was created in the yard of the ruined Agios Stefanos Monastery as the garden for the mansion on Atatürk's taking possession. This grove is called "Florya Atatürk Grove" (Turkish: Florya Atatürk Korusu) and is today a public park. The mansion is considered an example of the "Turkish Early Republican architecture".

Museum
Due to the encroaching urban development and the consequent pollution of the sea at the site, the mansion fell into disuse as an official residence. On September 6, 1988, the building was handed over to the National Palaces Department of the Turkish Grand National Assembly. It was then renovated and opened in 1993 to the public as a museum.

A section of the mansion is reserved as a social facility for members of parliament. The museum exhibits furniture, tableware, personal belongings including swimwear, as well as a collection of Atatürk's photographs taken at the site.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Florya Atatürk Marine Mansion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

TOPHANE MANSION

Tophane, Beyoğlu - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°01'38.0"N 28°58'56.2"E / 41.027222, 28.982278

Tophane Mansion / Beyoglu - Istanbul photo tophane_mansion110.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

The Tophane Pavilion gets its name from Tophane neighborhood, meaning Cannon factory in Turkish, where there was one. It's located next to the Nusretiye mosque and was one of the most important buildings on the Tophane Square during the Ottoman period. The kiosk was ordered by Sultan Abdülmecid and built by the British architect William James Smith in 1852.

 It was especially used by the sultans visiting these weapons factories in the neighborhood and also to receive foreign guests coming to the port by the sea, such as the Russian Czar's brother Grand duke Konstantin.

Many important events took place at this mansion. The Russian Tsar's brother Grand Duke Constantine was welcomed there by Sultan Abdülmecid. The 1897 International Conference which put an end to the Ottoman-Greek War was held at the Tophane Mansion. As was the convening of the International Straits Commission as a follow up to the Lausanne Treaty.

The mansion is parallel to the sea, rectangular and two stories high. On the exterior of the building there are baroque styled projections from the second story floor ledges. Internally the ceiling murals and marble fireplaces are the most striking features.  It has a European style like all other mansions of the same period, with fine hand work ceiling decorations and marble fireplaces.

At the moment Tophane Kiosk is closed to visitors and administrated by the Fine Arts faculty of Mimar Sinan University.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, March 24, 2017

IHLAMUR PAVILION

Ihlamur, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°03'03.0"N 29°00'06.0"E / 41.050833, 29.001667

Ihlamur Pavilion / Besiktas - Istanbul photo ihlamur_pavilion115.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Lovely imperial rest house "Ihlamur Kasrı" was built in the midst of Linden trees, where you can have a cup of coffee, or as the Turkish word Ihlamur implies, a cup of Linden tea. Ihlamur Palace (Turkish: Ihlamur Kasrı), is a former imperial Ottoman summer palace located in Istanbul, Turkey. It was constructed during the reign of Sultan Abdülmecid I (1839-1860). It is under the administration of the Turkish Department of National Palaces.

Ihlamur Valley, located between Beşiktaş, Yıldız and Nişantaşı is known as an excursion area belonging to Hacı Hüseyin Ağa, superintendent of the Navy Yard, and so called as “Hacı Hüseyin Vineyards” in 18th century. Although it was transformed into a “Hasbahçe” (imperial garden) belonging to the sultan during the reign of Sultan Ahmed III (1703-1730), this territory, known as “Hacı Hüseyin Vineyards” until second half of 19th century, took the attention during the reign of Sultan Abdülhamid I (1774-1789) and of Sultan Selim III (1789-1807) too.

It is mentioned in some sources that in the middle of the 18th century, there had previously been a kiosk on the site that that belonged to Hüseyin Efendi. In other sources, it is mentioned that there was an imperial garden (Has Bahçe) where linden trees grew at the beginning of the 18th century.  However, all the existing buildings were demolished and the present buildings were constructed by the Armenian-Turkish architect, Nikogos Balyan, between 1849-1855.

When Sultan Abdulmecid (1839-1861), ascended the Ottoman throne, construction of Ihlamur Pavilions were initiated on the area where Ihlamur Excursion is located. These two buildings, situated within a 24,724 square meters of woodland, bordered by high surrounding walls in patches and by cast fences at some places, have been called sometimes as “Nüzhetiye” and sometimes as “Ihlamur Pavilions” since their construction in 1849-1855.

Ceremonial Kiosk, which is the main building, has an impressive architecture at the front face with its staircase carrying Baroque characteristics which reflects the taste of the period and with its interesting and dynamic reliefs. For the interior ornaments of the pavilion consisting of an Entrance Hall and one room at each side, a decoration in compliance with the Western decoration understanding, which was preferred at Ottoman artworks during 19th century, was implemented.

A particular integrity was achieved with the furniture and furnishing elements in various European styles. The Merasim Kiosk was reserved for the sultan’s personal use. The Maiyet Kiosk, the simpler of the two, was used by the sultan’s entourage and family members, and it currently serves as a beautiful cafeteria. The Merasim Kiosk has been garnished with Baroque style carvings. The ceiling of the kiosk is covered with landscape pictures.

The porcelain ornaments decorating the fireplace are products of Yıdız Oven. The kiosk is decorated with crystal chandeliers, European-style furniture, Hereke carpets, and decorated vases.

The most sophisticated Merasim Köşk, was reserved for the Sultan's own use. A twisting baroque staircase frames the entrance and intense decoration surrounds the façade. The interior decoration is typical of l9th century Turkish architecture, highly westernized but eclectic, in keeping with the furnishings and fittings in various European styles. The Imperial Gate was reserved for the Sultan, his family and royal visitors only.

Maiyet Kiosk, used by sultan’s entourage and sometimes by his harem, is a less ornate building with respect to the other one. It exhibits a more traditional schema with its space arrangement which consist of corner rooms opening to a central sofa. The walls of Maiyet Kiosk are covered with stucco which look like marble, in different colours.

Ceremonial Kiosk of Ihlamur Pavilions is kept open to visits as a museum-palace and Maiyet Kiosk is organized as a winter cafeteria. The garden of the pavilion, around the Maiyet Kiosk and the garden around the pool at the interior part are also used as a summer cafeteria.

Sultan Abdülaziz (1830-1876) organized cock and ram fights as well as the wrestling competitions in which he personally participated in the garden of the Maiyet Kiosk. Sultan Abdülmecid I (1823-1861) welcomed Lamartine, a famous French writer, poet, and politician, in this kiosk. Sultan Mehmet Resat V accepted the king of Bulgaria and Serbia here.

The sultan's entourage or family members who accompanied him used the plainer and slightly smaller Maiyet Köşk.  The other two gates were used by foreign diplomats and guests. The large central pool, baroque in style and adorned with statues of lions was once surrounded by rose-beds.

There is a cafe in the Maiyet Köşk and part of the garden, and as at the other palaces and pavilions private receptions may be held here by prior arrangements. A newer building in the grounds that used to be accommodation for employees is now used to hold courses in painting, sculpture and drama mainly for children.

The pavilion was not used for a long time after the foundation of the Republic. The Ihlamur Pavilions were placed under the support of the National Palaces in 1966 as museum-palaces and are open to the public. The Merasim Kiosk was converted into “the Museum of Tanzimat,” and the Maiyet Kiosk into “The Historical Kiosks Museum.” Both Kiosks were completely restored during the 1980s. The pavilion was opened to visitors along with its garden in 1987.

Before the royal lodges were constructed here Abdülmecid used to visit this pleasant wooded valley frequently. There was nothing in the park but a tiny plain building and here Lamartine, the famous French writer and poet, was received by Sultan Abdülmecid in the mid 19th century. In his account of the occasion Lamartine could not disguise his disappointment at the humble setting in which he met the Ottoman sovereign. Lamartine would not have been disappointed by the Ihlamur Palace shortly afterwards.

HISTORY

Ihlamur Valley, located between Beşiktaş, Yıldız and Nişantaşı is known as an excursion area belonging to Hacı Hüseyin Ağa, superintendent of the Navy Yard, and so called as “Hacı Hüseyin Vineyards” in 18th century.

Although it was transformed into a “Hasbahçe” (imperial garden) belonging to the sultan during the reign of Sultan Ahmed III (1703-1730), this territory, known as “Hacı Hüseyin Vineyards” until second half of 19th century, took the attention during the reign of Sultan Abdulhamid I (1774-1789) and of Sultan Selim III (1789-1807) too. When Sultan Abdulmecid (1839-1861), ascended the Ottoman throne, construction of Ihlamur Pavilions were initiated on the area where Ihlamur Excursion is located.

The Ihlamur Pavilion is located at the intersection of Nüzhetiye Street between Ihlamur and Teşvikiye and has an area of about 25,000 square meters. It is mentioned in some sources that in the middle of the 18th century, there had previously been a kiosk on the site that that belonged to Hüseyin Efendi. In other sources, it is mentioned that there was an imperial garden (Has Bahçe) where linden trees grew at the beginning of the 18th century. However, all the existing buildings were demolished and the present buildings were constructed by the architect, Nikogos Balyan, between 1849-1855.

Ihlamur Valley lying behind the district of Beşiktaş was a popular picnic place in the early 18th century, when the vineyards here belonged to Hacı Hüseyin Ağa, superintendent of the Naval Arsenal. Although this attractive spot became an imperial estate during the reign of Ahmed III (1703-1730), it continued to be known by this name until the mid-19th century. Abdülhamid I (1774-1789) and his son Selim III (1789-1807) frequently visited this park.

Ihlamur Pavilions were part of the ambitious building programme initiated by Sultan Abdülmecid (1839-1860), including Dolmabahçe Palace at Beşiktaş and Küçüksu Pavilion on the Bosphorus.

Before the royal lodges were constructed here Abdülmecid used to visit this pleasant wooded valley frequently. There was nothing in the park but a tiny plain building and here Lamartine was received by Sultan Abdülmecid in the mid-19th century. In his account of the occasion the famous French poet could not disguise his disappointment at the humble setting in which he met the Ottoman sovereign.

Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876) was not as fond of Ihlamur as his elder brother, and seems to have come here only to watch cock and ram fights in the garden. Sultan Abdülaziz (1830-1876) organized cock and ram fights as well as the wrestling competitions in which he personally participated in the garden of the Maiyet Kiosk. Sultan Abdülmecid I (1823-1861) welcomed Lamartine, a famous French writer, poet, and politician, in this kiosk. Sultan Mehmed V Reşad (1909-1918) came here occasionally, and it was at Ihlamur that he received the kings of Bulgaria and Serbia.

The pavilion was not used for a long time after the foundation of the Republic. The Merasim Kiosk was converted into “the Museum of Tanzimat,” and the Maiyet Kiosk into “the Historical Kiosks Museum.” Both Kiosks were completely restored during the 1980s. The pavilion was opened to visitors along with its garden in 1987.

ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESING

These two buildings, situated within a 24,724 square meters of woodland, bordered by high surrounding walls in patches and by cast fences at some places, have been called sometimes as “Nüzhetiye” and sometimes as “Ihlamur Pavilions” since their construction in 1849-1855.

Ceremonial Kiosk, which is the main building, has an impressive architecture at the front face with its staircase carrying Baroque characteristics which reflects the taste of the period and with its interesting and dynamic reliefs. For the interior ornaments of the pavilion consisting of an Entrance Hall and one room at each side, a decoration in compliance with the Western decoration understanding, which was preferred at Ottoman artworks during 19th century, was implemented. A particular integrity was achieved with the furniture and furnishing elements in various European styles.

The Merasim Kiosk was reserved for the sultan’s personal use. The Merasim Kiosk has been garnished with Baroque style carvings. The ceiling of the kiosk is covered with landscape pictures. The porcelain ornaments decorating the fireplace are products of Yıdız Oven. The kiosk is decorated with crystal chandeliers, European-style furniture, Hereke carpets, and decorated vases.

The most elaborate of the two, known as the Merasim Köşk, was reserved for the sultan's own use. A curving baroque staircase frames the entrance and dense decoration swathes the façade. The interior decoration is typical of 19th century Ottoman architecture, highly westernised but eclectic, in keeping with the furnishings and fittings in various European styles.

The plainer and slightly smaller Maiyet Köşk was used by the sultan's entourage or family members who accompanied him. Maiyet Kiosk, used by sultan’s entourage and sometimes by his harem, is a less ornate building with respect to the other one. It exhibits a more traditional schema with its space arrangement which consist of corner rooms opening to a central sofa. The walls of Maiyet Kiosk are covered with stucco which look like marble, in different colours.

Lamartine would not have been disappointed by the two lodges which were built at Ihlamur shortly afterwards, however. Built by the architect Nikoğos Balyan between 1849 and 1855, they have been variously called the Nüzhetiye and Ihlamur Pavilions.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Ihlamur Pavilion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

YILDIZ ŞALE PAVILION

Yıldız, Beşiktaş - Istanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°03'12.0"N 29°00'50.0"E / 41.053333, 29.013889

Sale Pavilion / Yildiz, Besiktas - Istanbul photo sale_pavilion118.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Yıldız Palace and Yıldız Park covered an area of 500,000 square meters on the hillside overlooking the Bosphorus between Beşiktaş, Ortaköy and Balmumcu. Şale Pavilion is a residence building within the premises of Yıldız Palace in Istanbul. The sultan’s residence was in the Şale Kiosk or pavilion. The pavilion was built for foreign statesmen in the 19th century. It is the best maintained structure of the palace with the original furnishings and the inner decoration.

Yıldız Şale Köşkü is a 60-room Ottoman imperial palace of wood and stone built at the top of a hill in Yıldız Parkı overlooking the Bosphorus in the Beşiktaş district of Istanbul. It is the residential part of a larger palace complex that included administrative offices and guards' barracks. Begun on orders of Sultan Abdul Hamid II in 1880, it reached its final form in 1898 after several expansions.

HISTORY

This area of natural woodland became known as Kazancıoğlu Park after the Turkish conquest, and probably became an imperial estate during the reign of Sultan Ahmed I (1603-1617). Sultan Murad IV (1623-1640) is known to have enjoyed excursions here, and Selim III (1789-1807) had a country pavilion or köşk known as Yıldız built here for his mother Mihrişah Valide Sultan. It is after this köşk that the park came to be named.

Selim's successor Sultan Mahmud II (1808-1839), Sultan Abdülmecid (1839-1861) and Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876) had new mansions and pavilions constructed in the park, and in the late 19th century Sultan Abdülhamid (1876-1909) abandoned Dolmabahçe to make this complex his home. He greatly expanded the palace with many new buildings during his reign.

Yıldız Palace became the fourth seat of Ottoman government in Istanbul, after Eski Saray (the Old Palace) which stood where Istanbul University is today, Topkapı Palace and Dolmabahçe Palace.

ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESING

The building has two floors and a basement and constructed from a mix of wood and stone. It was constructed in three phases. The first part was built in the 1870s and was designed to resemble a Swiss chalet, hence the name Şale. Set in its own walled garden, Şale consists of three adjoining sections built at different dates. The original section dates from 1880, the second section designed by Sarkis Balyan from 1889, and the third section known as the Merasim Köşkü (literally Ceremonial Pavilion) was designed by the Italian architect Raimondo D'Aronco and completed in 1898.

 It was during this phase that the Sedefli Salon (Mother-of-Pearl Salon) was added. The name derives from the extensive use of mother-of-pearl that covered almost all of its surfaces. There are also detailed painted landscapes on the ceiling. The third section was also built for Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1898. The reception chamber was built during this period and remains the most impressive room in the entire Şale Pavilion.

Elegant features of the chamber include a gilded, coffered ceiling and large mirrors. Sultan Abdülhamid II was a skilled carpenter and actually made some of the pieces of furniture that can be found in the Şale Pavilion.

Each of the additional wings was built for two separate state visits by the German emperor Wilhelm II, since accommodating state guests was one of the Şale's main functions. The building has two main storeys and a basement, and is built of both timber and masonry. In keeping with traditional Ottoman houses, the Şale consists of two separate sections which could be used as Harem and Selamlık when required. There are seven entrances, and the windows have wooden shutters. Three elegant staircases, one of marble and the other two of wood, connect the two main floors.

The informal air of a country house is deceptive, as both the scale of the building and the opulence of the interior show. Behind the façade we find not a modest pavilion but a small palace, whose grandiose reception rooms are decorated with mural landscapes, geometric moulding, and painted designs in a mixture of baroque, rococo and Islamic style. Most imposing of all is the Ceremonial Hall, with its single piece Hereke carpet, custom made to fit the room and measuring 406 square meters, its gilded coffered ceiling and large pier mirrors.

The Banqueting Room has a more oriental atmosphere with doors intricately inlaid with mother-of-pearl, while the focal point of the Yellow Room is the landscapes which adorn the ceiling. The valuable furnishings imported from various European countries, the elegant porcelain stoves, magnificent vases, and splendidly carved bedroom suites bear witness to the sumptuous tastes of the period.

After the fall of the monarchy the Şale was being restored to its original function as a guest house for visiting heads of state and royalty. Among the famous names who have stayed here are Şah Rıza Pehlevi of Iran, King Faisal of Saudi Arabia, King Hüseyin of Jordan, President Sukarno of Indonesia, King Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, and President De Gaulle of France.

MUSEUM

Today the Şale Pavillion at Yıldız Palace is open to the public as a museum-palace, and private receptions are held in its gardens.

Among the group of buildings of Yildiz Palace, a part of the stables named as Istabl-ı Amire-i Ferhan and the maneage buildings gained new functionality after the completion of their restorations. Classical Turkish Arts Center is situated at one of the buildings. Maneage building was transformed into a conference hall which can be allocated to congresses and seminars.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Şale Pavillion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

ABDÜLMECİD EFENDİ PAVILION

Bağlarbaşı, Üsküdar - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°01'41.4"N 29°02'29.5"E / 41.028167, 29.041528

Abdulmecit Efendi Pavilion / Uskudar - Istanbul photo abdulmecit_mansion105.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

This is located on Gümüşyolu Street, accross from the Jewish graveyard. It was built for the last caliph Abdülmecid, when he was a prince. The area, known as the grove of Abdülmecid Efendi, measures about 160 acres. It is located in Bağlarbaşı, and descends down towards Nakkaştepe and Beylerbeyi. Before Abdülmecid, it used to belong to Hidiv Ismail Paşa.

On the enamelled tiles above the gate it is written: "There is no victor but Allah." This statement was used in the palaces, mosques and coins of the Andalusian Ummeyyades.

The same statement can be seen in the Yıldız Palace, which was built by Sultan Abdülhamid II, modeled on the Andalusian palaces. The gate is the most beautifully ornamented pavilion gate in İstanbul. On the walls and above the doors there are written many verses taken from Turkish and Arabic poets.

Abdülmecid Efendi (1 June 1868-23 August 1944) was born in Dolmabahçe Palace as the son of Sultan Abdülaziz and Hayranidil Kadınefendi, in his younger ages he was enrolled in the artillery branch of the army and he was educated by Halil, Hüseyin and Said Paşas. He was interested in horsemanship, hunting, wrestling, fencing and painting and music, he developed his art as a painter.

Abdülmecid Efendi who knew French, Persian, Arabic in good level, learned also German and English as much as to follow the publications. Abdülmecid Efendi who was in close relations with art and literature circles, during his princehood worked in Feriye Palace in winters and in the ateliers situated in Bağlarbaşı Köşkü in summers.

When he became hair apparent, he continued working in Dolmabahçe Hair Section and in his atelier in Dolmabahçe, when he settled here as caliph. Abdülmecid Efendi became the honorary president of the Ottoman Painters Association founded in 1909 and he supported financially for the publication of Ottoman Painters Association Newspaper.

The first of 1914 generation besides supporting Galatasaray exhibitions opened in Galatasaray Dormitory in 1916, he himself participated in this activity by his paintings. The supports and interest of Abdülmecid Efendi for the painting was not limited with this. Another one is the activity named as Şişli Atelier. The art works produced in Şişli Atelier took their place in Vienna Exhibition in 1918 that was the first exhibition opened in Europe by Turkish painters.

Abdülmecid Efendi, participated to 1918 Vienna exhibition by his paintintings, “Otoportre”, “Harem’de Goethe”, “Harem’de Beethoven” and “I.Sultan Selim”. In 1 November 1922 as the sultanate and the caliphate were separated and as Sultan Vahideddin left Istanbul in 17 November 1922, Abdülmecid Efendi was chosen caliph by Turkish Grand National Assembly.

In 3 March 1924 caliphate was abolished by law and the Ottoman Emperor was sent abroad. Abdülmecid Efend first went to Switzerland then to Nice in France and he settled in Paris. In 1944 he died here and he was buried in Medine Cenetül-Baki tomb.

Today, the pavilion is used for the social activities of Yapı Kredi Bank.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Abdulmecid Efendi Pavilion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

MASLAK PAVILION

Maslak, Sarıyer - Istanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°07'10.1"N 29°01'33.7"E / 41.119472, 29.026028

Malta Pavilion / Yildiz, Besiktas - Istanbul photo malta_pavilion173.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Facilities
Cafe (Located in the garden of the Palace), Toilettes (Located at the garden of the Palaces), Parking (Located at the entrance of the Palace)

The Maslak Pavilion is located on Büyükdere Street, at the intersection of Istinye and Tarabya. The hilltop site of these royal lodges overlooking the Bosphorus is between the districts of Levent and Ayazağa on the European shore. The Maslak Pavilion was used for hunting and as a resting place by Sultan Abdülhamid II who learned how to become the new Sultan of the Ottoman Empire in this pavilion.

HISTORY
Sultan Mahmud II (1808-1839) first had a pavilion constructed here, and Sultan Abdülhamid II (1876-1909) lived in the later pavilion as a young man. Exactly when the royal lodges were constructed and by whom is unknown, but most can be roughly dated to the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876).

ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESING

Set in a wooded park with an area of 170,000 square meters, the Maslak Royal Lodges consist of the main Kasr-ı Hümayün (imperial kiosk), the Mabeyn-i Hümayün (imperial court) with its adjoining Conservatory, the Çadır Köşk and Paşalar Dairesi. Commanding a magnificent view over the Bosphorus strait and set amongst green woodland, the kasırs are outstanding examples of late 19th century Ottoman architecture.

Compared to other pavilions of the Ottomans, it has a simple structure in that only the sultan's signature has been is used to decorate the different sections of the pavilion. Sultan Abdülhamid II had his study and bedroom in the Kasr-ı Hümayün, and it was here that he was informed of his accession to the Ottoman throne.

Kasr-i Hümayun
The Kasr-i Hümayun (imperial kiosk) contains the bedroom and working room of Sultan Abdülhamit II. It is a two story structure that has a basement and and attic with a view of the sea. On both sides of the entry, there are columns on which the balcony is placed. The ceilings of all the rooms and the walls of the hall are decorated with engraved pictures.

Mabeyn-i Hümayun
The Mabeyn-i Hümayun (imperial court) was the private flat of the sultan, and consists of a single storey made of stone. There are invaluable plants, camellias, ferns, and banana trees in the lemon mansion. There is also a beautiful greenhouse located in the middle of the lemon mansion.

Çadır Kiosk
The Çadır Kiosk is a fancy two story structure in the shape of an octagon. It has wide valances on the roof, a balcony ringing the kiosk, and is built out of wood.

Paşalar Dairesi
Paşalar Dairesi (General's room): It is a beautiful structure made of stone with a single storey and has a Turkish bath in the building.

MUSEUM

Today, Kasr-ı Hümayun has been restored in the light of the documents, memoirs and old photographs and opened to the visits as a museum-palace in 1986. Mabeyn-i Hümayun and its annexes Limonluk and Çadır Kiosk and its garden have similarly been handled and restored and transformed into cafeterias where visitors may take a rest.

The camellias in the Limonluk, which especially bloom during the winter months, are the oldest examples of their kinds in the city. The gardens of the Maslak Pavilions can be allocated to national or international receptions.

Maslak Royal Lodges Cafe give the chance to rest within historic environments with cold-hot drinks, snack food and breakfast services in Maslak Pavilion.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Maslak Pavillion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

SEPETÇİLER PAVILION

Sarayburnu - Istanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°01'00.0"N 28°58'54.0"E / 41.016667, 28.981667

Sepetciler Pavilion / Sarayburnu, Fatih - Istanbul photo sepetciler_pavilion120.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Sepetçiler Pavilion is one of the pavilions that remained intact to this day, located in the external garden of Topkapı Palace on the sea walls. The construction of Sepetçiler Pavilion was started in 1591 by Grand Vizier Sinan Pasha in Sultan Murat III’s era (1574-1595) and was completed in the first year of the grand vizier office of Ferhat Pasha.

The materials that were used in the construction of the pavilion, built on the walls from the era of Byzantium Emperor Theodosius II, were brought from various places of Anatolia: the red marble was brought from Darıca and Rusçuk, tiles came from İznik, and iron accessories and nails came from Samakoy and Salonika.

According to the text on the epigraph on the door arch of the pavilion; the pavilion, which was located within the borders of Topkapı Palace in the era when it was constructed, was reconstructed in 1643 in Sultan İbrahim’s era (1640-1658), and renewed in 1739 in Sultan Mahmut I’s era (1730-1754).

It was repaired in the middle of the 19th century. Being one of the most magnificent structures constructed during the Ottoman era, there are several rumors about Sepetçiler Pavilion. One of them is that this pavilion was called Sepetçiler because the old buildings in Edirne Palace were called Sepetçi or Sultani.

According to another rumor, Sultan Ibrahim received help from sepetçi traders (basket makers) when he decided to reconstruct the old manor here, as he protected the mat makers and basket makers located behind this pavilion. In reality, basket makers continued their work around the pavilion after its construction and the pavilion actually received its name because of the basket makers located there.

Sepetçiler Pavilion’s significance for the urban life of Istanbul was that it is where the imperial boats were docked. Before the railway cut off the connection of the pavilion with Topkapı Palace, sultans’ boats were protected here mostly were small boats, and 5-6 boat houses for galleys here.

Sepetçiler Pavilion has an architectural layout with face stone square plan, domed, with iwans at four edges. The dome is wooden and hidden inside the roof. The parts with iwans effused with cantilevers from the square location with domes over its display a half square plan. There is a three part double partite entrance with a dome in the middle in front of this location. There are service areas under this area.

Having been abandoned for a long period of time, the building was restored by the Directorate General of Old Works and Museums in 1980. After the restorations made in 1980 by the Directorate General of Foundations in 1980, it was used as the International Press Centre of the Directorate General of Press. The Eminonu Service Foundation restored the pavilion in 1998. Sepetçiler Pavilion has served in various capacities, such as a restaurant in addition to as the Directorate General of Press, and was used as the Project Office of European Capital of Culture until June 2011.

Allocated to Turkish Green Crescent Society as of 2011, Sepetçiler Pavilion is now used as the General Headquarters building of the Turkish Green Crescent Society. The Green Crescent is a non-profit and non-governmental organization that empowers youth and adults with factual information about drugs so they can make informed decisions against different kind of addictions including alcohol, tobacco, drug, gambling etc. The Green Crescent was established in 1920 and given the status of Public-Beneficial Society (public beneficial society status is given to the organizations that serve for public benefits) by the Turkish government in 1934.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Turkish Green Crescent - Headquarters

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : info@yesilay.org.tr
Phone : +90 212 527 1683
Fax : +90 212 522 8463

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

KÜÇÜKSU PAVILION

Anadolu Hisarı, Beykoz -  Istanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°04'43.0"N 29°03'54.0"E / 41.078611, 29.065000

Kucuksu Pavilion / Beykoz - Istanbul photo kucuksu_pavilion139.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Küçüksu Palace or Küçüksu Pavilion, aka Göksu Pavilion, (Küçüksu Kasrı) is a summer palace in Istanbul, Turkey, situated in the Küçüksu neighborhood of Beykoz district on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus between Anadoluhisarı and the Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge. The tiny palace was used by Ottoman sultans for short stays during country excursions and hunting.

The green area between Göksu and Küçüksu rivers rising .on the slopes of Alemdağ and flowing into Bosphorus near Anadoluhisarı was one of the imperial gardens of sultans and became one of the most favourite promenade in time. Evliya Celebi, the famous traveller of 17th century described Göksu as a "river like adam’s ale" where people used to go boating, a peaceful area surrounded with rose gardens, small mansions and imperial mills.

Sultan Murad IV (1623-1640) ordered to landscape Küçüksu and its environs covered with dense cypress trees up to Kandilli and named the area as "Silver Cypress". The first construction in the imperial garden began during the reign of Sultan Mahmud I (1730-1754). His Grand Vizier Divitdar Emin Mehmed Pasha ordered to built a timber pavilion for Sultan between the years 1751-1752 who used to go there to hunt and target practice.

During the reign of Sultan Selim III (1789-1807) this two-storeyed building by the sea side was restored and in 1806 he ordered to built a fountain there for his beloved mother Mihrişah Valide Sultan. The pavilion which was also used during the period of Sultan Mahmud II (1808-1839) was demolished by the order of Sultan Abdülmecid (1839-1861) and Küçüksu Pavilion was built there between the years 1856-1857.

Its facade decoration was restored and enriched during the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876). The pavilion which was also one of the most popular places for Atatürk in Republican period was opened to public as a museum in 1996.

Küçüksu Pavilion was designed by Nikoğos Balyan and completed in 1857. The pavilion has a ground area of 15 x 27 meters and consists of a basement and two main storeys, the basement containing a larder, kitchen and servants' quarters. Both first and second floors have four corner rooms opening onto a central gallery, a plan which reflects that of the traditional Turkish house.

The pavilion was designed for short stays when the sultan took country excursions or went hunting in the woodland here. Unlike other imperial buildings Küçüksu was not surrounded by high walls but by castiron railings with gates on all four sides. During the reign of Sultan Abdülmecid's younger brother Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876) more elaborate decoration was added to the façade. All the outbuildings which once belonged to the pavilion have since been demolished.

The ornate seaward façade and double flight of steps sweeping exuberantly around the ornamental pool and fountain are decorated with diverse western motifs. This European exterior is echoed in the interior furnishing and decoration executed by Sechan, stage designer at Vienna Opera House.

The ceilings are richly decorated with carton-pierre moulding and painted designs. There are so many fireplaces made of Italian marble of various colours in diverse styles, that Küçüksu is like a museum of 19th century fireplace design. The elegant parquet floors have different patterns in each of the rooms, which are furnished with European style furniture, carpets and paintings.

The pavillion is garnished with rococo ornaments which added a fresh complexion to the pavilion with perfect external engraving. Sultan Selim III dedicated the Baroque style fountain to his mother, Valide Mihrişah Sultan, in 1807. The fountain and the pool in the garden are well integrated with the Küçüksu Pavilion. The pavilion was late returned into a museum showcasing carvings, crystal chandelers, carpets, and the the fireplace. All these give an intense visionary pleasure for visitors.

The building consists of two main stories and a basement on a footprint of 15 x 27 m. Unlike other palace gardens with high walls; its garden is surrounded by cast iron railings with one gate at each of the four sides. The basement was appointed with kitchen, larder, and servant's quarters, with the floors above reflecting the design of a traditional Turkish house - four corner rooms surrounding a central hall.

The rooms at the waterfront have two fireplaces while the others have one each, all fashioned from colorful Italian marble. The rooms boast crystal chandeliers from Bohemia, with curtains, furniture upholstery, and carpets woven in Hereke. The halls and the rooms exhibit paintings and arts objects; Sechan, stage designer at Vienna State Opera, was charged for the decoration of the interior.

After the establishment of the Turkish Republic, Küçüksu Pavilion was used as a state guest house for some years, but today is open to the public as a museum-palace. The pavilion was extensively restored in 1994 and the surrounding garden and parkland, nearby fountain and quay are now being transformed into a park where the public can enjoy picnics and excursions as in previous centuries. When this project is completed, the garden of Küçüksu Pavilion will be available for private receptions upon application.

Küçüksu Pavilion give the chance to rest within historic environments with cold-hot drinks, snack food and breakfast services. There is a cafeteria in the courtyard where you can sit and enjoy the ships passing while sipping your Turkish tea or Turkish coffee.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Department of National Palaces / Küçüksu Pavilion

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 259 3292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

İZZET PAŞA TEKKESİ (VEZİR TEKKE)

Eyüp - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'40.4"N 28°55'46.0"E / 41.044556, 28.929444

Izzet  Pasa Tekkesi (Vezir Tekke) / Eyup - Istanbul photo vezirtekke_eyup103.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Ayvansarayî’nin Hadikatül Cevami’sinde Sadrı Esbak İzzet Paşa, Hacı Mehmet İzzet Paşa veya İzzet Mehmet Paşa Tekkesi adıyla anıldığı belirtilen Vezir Tekkesi, Sofular Mahallesi’nde, Vezir Tekke Sokağı’nda Eyüp Bulvarı üzerindedir. İzzet Paşa’nın 1796 yılında bizzat kurduğu vakıf tarafından yaptırılan bu tekke, vaktiyle Nakşîbendi tekkesi olarak hizmet veriyordu.

The Vezir Derwish Lodge founded 1796 by İzzet Mehmet Paşa, which was located on Vezir Tekke Str. in Sofular district of Eyüp, Istanbul, which had partly been damaged and also been partly in ruins.

The restoration and renovation works of the church which was made of wood is become more of an issue due to it is being destroyed a little more every day. The Lodge which was a non-governmental organizations of the time was built by the Grand Vizier named İzzet Mehmet Paşa and allocated to the use of a sheikh of Sufi order.

Attention was drawn to the restoration project of the lodge in the report  approved by the Municipal Council in which the restoration project of the Eyüp Vezir Dervish Lodge was approved by the Istanbul 2nd Cultural and Natural Estates Conservation Board.

It was stated in the report titled Under the Project it is aimed to renovate the Eyüp Vezir Dervish Lodge to make a contribution to the social and cultural life of the city.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : İzzet Paşa Tekkesi (Vezir Tekke)

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : bilgi@sahniseman.org
Phone : +90 212 613 1805
Fax : +90 212 613 1806

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

HASIRIZADE ELİF EFENDİ TEKKESİ

Sütlüce, Beyoglu - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'55.0"N 28°56'29.6"E / 41.048624, 28.941564

Hasirizade Elif Efendi Tekkesi / Sutluce - Beyoglu photo elifefendi_lodge112.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Hasırızade Elif Efendi Tekkesi  was built in 1784. Elif Efendi, Hasırızade (b. in Sütlüce, Rajab 1266 / May 1850; d. 28 Jomada I 1345 / 4 December 1926), Turkish poet and scholar. He was the son of Aḥmad Moktar Efendi, the shaikh of the takiya (dervish lodge) at Sütlüce in Istanbul. On 1 Sawwal 1280 / 10 March 1864 his father entrusted him to the Mawlawī reciter Ḥosam-al-Din Efendi. After his initial education, he studied Arabic with well-known scholars.

In 1303 / 1885-86 he received his ejaza (q.v.), while also taking lessons in calligraphy and attending lessons in Rumi’s Matonawi taught by Ṣalaḥ-al-Din Efendi, the shaikh of the Mawlawī lodge at Yenikapı. Elif Efendi then began to teach the Mesnevi, and in 1316 / 1898-99 he donned the Mawlawi turban and garment.

When in 1297 / 1879-80 Aḥmad Moktar Efendi went on pilgrimage to Mecca, he placed his son in charge of the takiya during his absence. The shaikh resumed his post after his return, while Elif Efendi remained his deputy (nayeb) until his father’s death. At that point he succeeded his father as the takiya’s shaikh and devoted all his time to the teaching of the Mesnevi.

He also wrote poetry in Arabic and Persian. A considerable part of his Divan includes Persian qaṣidas and gazals. His Divan has not yet been published. His prose works comprise a few resalas, including one called Moktar al-enbaʾ fi’l-ḥoruf wa’l rosuf wa baʿż al-asmaʾ in Turkish and a commentary (sarḥ) on Komayl b. Zīad’s Semerel al-ḥads fī mazīyat al-nafs, which consists of responses Komayl received from ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭāleb (q.v.) to questions about the soul (nafs).

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Hasırızade Elif Efendi Lodge

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : info@elifefendidergahi.com
Phone : +90 212 255 7171

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

BAHARİYE MEVLEVİ TEKKESİ

Bahariye, Eyüp - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°03'21.3"N 28°56'22.5"E / 41.055917, 28.939583

Bahariye Mevlevi Tekkesi / Eyup - Istanbul photo bahariye_lodge125.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

The Beşiktaş Mevlevi Lodge (the Beşiktaş Mevlevihanesi) is the third Mevlevi lodge established in Istanbul. Another peculiarity of this lodge is that it is the last Mevlevi lodge to be allocated by government officials. Other Mevlevi lodges established in Istanbul were allocated by Mevlevi Dedes (Kasımpaşa, Üsküdar and Bahariye).

The Beşiktaş Mevlevi lodge was the third establishment after Galata and Yenikapı Mevlevi houses and established in 1613 by the Ottoman Grand Vizier Ohrili Hüseyin Pasha for Ağazade Mehmed Dede in Beşiktaş, Istanbul. The Beşiktaş Mevlevihane was a building that suffered a number of misfortunes; first of all it was demolished to make way for the Çırağan Palace and rebuilt next to the graveyard in Maçka.

The founder of this Mevlevi lodge was one of the leading government officials of XVII, Ohrili Hüseyin Pasha. (Died in May 1622). The Mevlevi lodge had functioned until 1284/1867 in Besiktaş, in that year it was deconstructed by Sultan Abdulaziz in order to build Çırağan Palace in its stead; firstly it was moved to Karacehennem Ibrahim Pasha Mansion in Fındıklı and then moved to its own place in Maçka after it was completed in 1288/1871.

It was again demolished to make way for the new barracks being built on the orders of Sultan Abdülaziz, and rebuilt yet again on a site beside the Golden Horn in the Bahariye neighbourhood, which is on the road leading from Eyüp to Alibeyköy, thus gaining a new lease of life. This moving took place in 1873. Bahariye Mevlevihane was left unattended and neglected just like the other places after the closing down of lodges and was destroyed in the course of time.

But when this lodge was demolished in 1291/1874 for construction of military barracks, it was moved to Hatap Emin Mustafa and Huseyin Efendi Mansions in Eyüp, and after its construction was completed in 1294/1877, it was moved to new building in Eyüp Bahariyesi and it functioned as Bahariye Mevlevi lodge until 1925.

The first sheikh of Beşiktas Mevlevî lodge was Ağazade Mehmed Hakiki Dede who was the sheikh of Gelibolu Mevlevi lodge at the same time. (1063/1652). While Kaptan-ı Derya (literally the Captain of all seas) Ohrili Huseyin Pasha was returning from his Mediterranean Sea expedition, he took hand from Ağazade Mehmed Dede and got the good news that he would soon be given the seal of the Grand Vizier.

In March 1030/1621 Grand Vizier Huseyin Pasha constructed the Beşiktaş Mevlevi lodge and asked Mehmed Dede to be the first postnishin (sheikh) here, Mehmed Dede accepted it and the his mission as a sheikh started in the Gelibolu and Beşiktaş Mevlevi lodges and continued until Hüseyin Pasha’s murder in the same year. After Ağazade Mehmed Dede, chronologically, Sheikh Süleyman Dede (died in. 1065/1654), Hasan Dede (died in. 1071/1660), Nâcî Ahmed Dede (died in.1122/1710), Çengî Yusuf Dede (died in.1080/1669), Eyyûbî Mehmed Memiş Dede (died in. 1136/1723) Memiş Dede’s son Ahmed Dede (died in. 1177/1763) Memiş Dede’s son Mehmed Sâdık Dede (died in. 1178/1764), Abdülahad Dede (died in. 1180/1766), and Trabluslu Ahmed Dede (died in. 1185/1771) served in the Besiktas Mevlevi lodge.

Hüseyin Fahreddin Dede, the last Sheikh of the Beşiktaş/Bahâriye Mevlevî lodge, was a composer, ney player, poet and was well known with his poetry and music love around mystic and art circles. Hüseyin Fahreddin Dede was a distinguished gentle character of his era, his proficiency with his performances of ney and his compositions were thought to be matchless.

Hüseyin Fahreddin Dede’s musical success made Bahariye Mevlevi lodge one of the best musical centers of Istanbul through the end of XIX century and they performed music with Celaleddin Dede, the sheikh of the Yenikapı Mevlevî Lodge, Ataullah Dede, the sheikh of the Galata Lodge and all the famous musician masters of that period such as Hafız Şevki Bey, Medenî Azîz Efendi, Tanbûrî Kemal Bey, Yeniköylü Hasan Efendi, Bolahenk Nuri Bey, Dr. Suphi Ezgi and Rauf Yekta. With those who are accepted as the most important composers and musicians of the 20th century; Udî Mehmed Sabri Efendi (died in 1914), Mehmed Raûf Yektâ Bey (ö. 1935), Ahmed Avnî Konuk (died. 1938), Şeyh Rıza Efendi, Kazım Uz, Şeyh Osman Dede, they performed music.

They brought up Zekâizâde Ahmed Nureddin, Râşid Efendi (an officer in Telgraf Nezareti, like PTT today), Doktor Subhî Bey and Arif Bey, Münir Kökden, Sabri Efendi, Nurullah Kılıç and Cemal Dede.(Neyzen-in-chief) The characteristic of the Beşiktaş/Bahariye Mevlevi lodge in the last century was that there were many Mevlevis here who were in a manner of Bektaşi. The Mevlevî lodge was left alone in 1925, it became ruined as the times passed, and in 1986 all the remains of the lodge vanished in the scope of the Golden Horn project.

The Bahariye Mevlevihane, which consisted of a number of timber buildings resembling mansions, added a further dimension of beauty to this part of the Golden Horn. However, after the closure of the dervish convents these buildings were either destroyed by fire or demolished and nothing survives to indicate where it once stood. Today only the mescid section of the lodge is intact. The restoration of Bahariye Lodge that started in 2007 was completed in 2011. It is used for civil purposes of culture and art.

Bahariye Mevlevihanesi, last dervish lodge of Istanbul, raised many artists up. Zekai Dede Efendi, his son Ahmet Irsoy, Rauf Yekta, Suphi Ezgi are couple of important musicians who grown up in here. Abdülbaki Gökpınarlı who is known as the last important figure of Sufi literature, was also grown up in the same dervish lodge.

Bahariye Mevlevihanesi (lodge used by Mevlevi dervishes) was in a very bad situation, but Eyüp Municipality restorated there paying large sum of money and turned it into a very nice cultural centre by Eyüp Belediyesi Kültür ve Sosyal İşler Müdürlüğü.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Human And Civilization Movement

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : bilgi@imh.org.tr
Phone : +90 212 501 3171
Fax: +90 212 501 3105

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.