Thursday, March 16, 2017

ÜSKÜDAR MEVLEVİ TEKKESİ

Üsküdar - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°01'21.6"N 29°00'38.9"E / 41.022657, 29.010817

Uskudar Mevlevi Tekkesi / Istanbul photo uskudar_lodge112.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

The Üsküdar Mevlevî Lodge was the last of Mevlevi lodges established in Istanbul. Though other four Mevlevi lodges in Istanbul were constructed on European side, Üsküdar Mevlevi lodge was constructed on Anatolian side. It is located on the western side of Doğancılar Avenue in Ayazma neighborhood of Imrahor district in Üsküdar. The mosque, in use by a association marks the spot of the Üsküdar Mevlevihane. It was the housing of a derwish.

Located to the west of Doğancılar Street, this convent was founded in 1792 by Sultanzade Halil Numan Dede Bey from the Galata convent of the Mevlevî dervishes. He decided to convert his own house in Üsküdar into a lodge. Unlike similiar convents, it was designed to accomadate dervishes coming from Anatolia to İstanbul or those setting out for Anatolia.

He was Numan Halil, the son of sheikh of the Galata Mevlevihane. His father was the cousin of Ali Pasha, the Secon Man in the Ottoman Empire. This well-to-do derwish had first his house rebuild into a semahane. Whirling was quite popular and in 1794 the first Mevlevihane was build in the garden, together with a matbah (kitchen), selamlık, harem and derwisj cells. When the founder died in 1798, his tomb became a place of great spritual power to the Ottoman emperors.

The ancestor of all succeeding Sultans, Mahmud II, had the Mevlevihane rebuild in 1834-1835. His mother was a cousin of Napoleon's wife Josephine. Among Sultan Mahmud II's most notable achievements, the Janissary corps was abolished in 1826, permitting the establishment of a modern Ottoman Army. By the early 17th century, the Janissary corps had ceased to function as an elite military unit. Any sultan who attempted to modernize the Ottoman military structure and replace the Janissaries was either immediately killed or deposed.

In the books written especially about the poets, the numbers of Mevlevîs are not low and the distinguished names of the classical Ottoman Poetry were all Mevlevis, such as Şeyhulislam Bahaî, Cevrî, Şeyhulislam Yahya, Fasîh Ahmed Dede, Neşâtî Ahmed Dede, Müneccimbaşı Ahmed Dede, Nâyî Osman Dede, Receb Enîs Dede, Nef’î, Nâilî, Nâbî, Nedîm, Sâkıb Mustafa Dede, İlhâmî (Selim III) and finally poets like Şeyh Gâlib. And this is well known by all literature circles and authors of tezkire (biography books written for certain groups of people).

These lodges did not just trained proficient composers and writers; they also secured the trainings of other Mevlevi artists who were prolific in other sorts of fine arts as calligraphy, drawing and gilding. Even more remarkable is that, these Mevlevis did not just confine themselves to these classical arts, they also dealt with bookbinding, paper craving, and produced clock, knife and pencil sharpener; the Mevlevi dervishes connected to the Mevlevi lodges of Istanbul have contributed to Turkish culture and art greatly by the means of their works of poetry and literature and all those art activities.

The fact that the mausoleum is located under the auditorium for the whirling dervishes symbolizes the existing intimacy between the sufi masters and their dervishes. This architectual feature can also be observed in the early Turkish-Islamic cupolas. It was restored by Ahmed Fevzi Paşa, the chief commander of Sultan Mahmud II. A part of the building still serves as a convent for whirling Mevlevî dervishes.

Today the word "derwish" may suggest 'poor' but not in this case. He was Numan Halil, the son of sheikh of the Galata Mevlevihane. His father was the cousin of Ali Pasha, the Secon Man in the Ottoman Empire. This well-to-do derwish had first his house rebuild into a semahane. Whirling was quite popular and in 1794 the first Mevlevihane was build in the garden, together with a matbah (kitchen), selamlık, harem and derwish cells.

When the founder died in 1798, his tomb became a place of great spritual power to the Ottoman emperors. The ancestor of all succeeding Sultan Mahmud II, had the Mevlevihane rebuild in 1834-1835.

His son Sultan Abdülmecid (1839-1861) repaired all other parts of the Üsküdar Mevlevihane structures and proclaimed in November 1839 the Tanzimat edict, consolidating and enforcing reforms. Sultan Abdülmecid wanted to encourage Ottomanism among the secessionist subject nations and stop the rise of nationalist movements within the empire, but failed to succeed despite trying to integrate non-Muslims and non-Turks more thoroughly into the Ottoman society with new laws and reforms.

After a law against spiritual organisations the monasterie lost all its functions. Part of it was rebuild into a mosque. Beside the grave of the founder you find the graves of the eminent Ali Seyda Khan (1799), Mehmet Hüsameddin Çelebi (1801), Sheikh Haci Ali Khan (1802), Ismail Hulusi Khan (1808), Abdullah Necip Khan (1836), Abdulkadir Kadri Khan (1850 ) and Ahmet Vesim Pasha (1910).

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : Klasik Türk Sanatları Vakfı

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : sanat@ktsv.com.tr
Phone : +90 216 391 1122
Fax : +90 216 391 1120

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

No comments:

Post a Comment